Posts for: April, 2011

By Charles Dean
April 25, 2011
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What Is Tooth Decay?

Tooth decay is caused by a variety of things; in medical terms, cavities are called caries, which are caused by long-term destructive forces acting on tooth structures such as enamel and the tooth's inner dentin material.

These destructive forces include frequent exposure to foods rich in sugar and carbohydrates; soda, candy, ice cream-even milk-are the common culprits. Left inside your mouth from non-brushing and flossing, these materials break down quickly, allowing bacteria to do their dirty work in the form of a harmful, colorless sticky substance called plaque.

The plaque works in concert with leftover food particles in your mouth to form harmful acids that destroy enamel and other tooth structures.

If cavities aren't treated early enough, they can lead to more serious problems requiring treatments such as root canal therapy.

Preventing Cavities

The best defense against cavities is good oral hygiene, including brushing with a fluoride toothpaste, flossing and rinsing. Your body's own saliva is also an excellent cavity fighter, because it contains special chemicals that rinse away many harmful materials. Chewing a good sugarless gum will stimulate saliva production between brushing.

Special sealants and varnishes can also be applied to stave off cavities from forming.

If you have any of the following symptoms, you may have a cavity:

  • Unusual sensitivity to hot and cold water or foods.
  • A localized pain in your tooth or near the gum line.
  • Teeth that change color.

Baby Bottle Tooth Decay

Baby bottle tooth decay is caused by sugary substances in breast milk and some juices, which combine with saliva to form pools inside the baby's mouth.

If left untreated, this can lead to premature decay of your baby's future primary teeth, which can later hamper the proper formation of permanent teeth.

One of the best ways to avoid baby bottle tooth decay is to not allow your baby to nurse on a bottle while going to sleep. Encouraging your toddler to drink from a cup as early as possible will also help stave off the problems associated with baby bottle tooth decay.


By Charles Dean
April 11, 2011
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More and more people are avoiding the need for dentures as they grow older, going against the notion that false teeth are a normal part of growing older.

In fact, there's usually no reason for you NOT to keep your teeth your entire life, providing you maintain a healthy balanced diet and practice good oral hygiene.

Another desirable side effect of good oral hygiene: avoiding more serious problems such as hypertension, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and even stroke. Indeed, medical research is beginning to show that a healthy mouth equates to a healthy body and a longer life.

Dexterity and Arthritis
People who suffer from arthritis or other problems of dexterity may find it difficult and painful to practice good oral hygiene.

Thankfully, industry has responded with ergonomically designed devices such as toothbrushes and floss holders that make it easier to grasp and control.

You can also use items around the house to help you. Inserting the handle of your toothbrush into a small rubber ball, or extending the handle by attaching a small piece of plastic or Popsicle stick may also do the trick.

Floss can also be tied into a tiny loop on either side, making it easier to grasp and control the floss with your fingers.


By Charles Dean
April 04, 2011
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Dentistry - Interesting??
I bet you didn't think it was possible, but here are a few dental fun facts that may find you saying "Wow, I didn't know that!"

  • Each person's set of teeth is unique - much like their fingerprints - even in identical twins.

  • Some cheeses are have been found to protect teeth from decay.

  • The Mexican version of the Tooth Fairy is known as the Tooth Mouse, which takes the tooth and leaves treasures in its place.

  • If you're right handed, you will chew your food on your right side. If you're left handed, you will tend to chew your food on your left side.

  • The major causes of tooth loss in people under age 35 are sports, accidents and fights.

  • George Washington's dentures were made from walrus, hippopotamus, and cows' teeth, as well as elephant tusks.

  • The most valuable tooth was one a nobleman purchased - belonging to the famous scientists Isaac Newton - for $4,560. It was set in a ring.

  • In 200 AD, the Romans used a mixture of bones, eggshells, oyster shells and honey to clean their teeth.

  • Queen Elizabeth I's teeth were noticeably discolored. A German traveler, Paul Henter, speculated that the discoloration was due to the Queen's excessive consumption of sugar, making the first recorded association between sugar and tooth decay.

  • The second most common disease in the United States is tooth decay. The first is the common cold.

Animal Chompers 

  • Ants can lift an object up to fifty times their body-weight and carry it over their heads. They don't do this with their feet, but with their mouths.

  • Crocodiles don't clean their own teeth - they let a plover (little bird) pick their teeth for scraps of leftover food.

  • The largest toothed mammal in the world is the sperm whale. A whale's lower jaw, measuring 16'5" long, is exhibited in the British Museum of Natural History in London. The whale it belonged to reportedly measured 84 feet in length.

  • A snail can have about 25,000 teeth (on its tongue).

  • Horses teeth are extremely long and grow continually. They wear down, change shape and become discolored as they grow, so we can really tell a horse's age by looking at his teeth.

  • A shark's teeth are literally as hard as steel.

 




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