Posts for: October, 2012

By Charles Dean
October 24, 2012
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral health   root canal  
Root canals are tiny passageways that branch off from beneath the top of the tooth, coursing their way vertically downward, until they reach the tip of the root.


All teeth have between one and four root canals.

Many tooth problems involve infections that spread to the pulp, which is the inner chamber of the tooth containing blood vessels, nerves and other tissues. When the infection becomes worse, it can begin affecting the roots. A traumatic injury to a tooth can also compromise the pulp, leading to similar problems.

A diseased inner tooth brings a host of problems including pain and sensitivity as the first indications of a problem.  However, inside a spreading infection can cause small pockets of pus to develop, which can lead to an abscess. 

Root canal therapy is a remarkable treatment with a very high rate of success, and involves removing the diseased tissue, halting the spread of infection and restoring the healthy portion of the tooth. In fact, root canal therapy is designed to save a problem tooth; before the procedure was developed and gained acceptance, the only alternative for treating a diseased tooth was extraction.

Procedure

Root canal therapy usually entails one to three visits. During the first visit, a small hole is drilled through the top of the tooth and into the inner chamber. Diseased tissue is removed, the inner chamber cleansed and disinfected, and the tiny canals reshaped. The cleansed chamber and canals are filled with an elastic material and medication designed to prevent infection. If necessary, the drilled hole is temporarily filled until a permanent seal is made with a crown.

Most patients who have root canal experience little or no discomfort or pain, and enjoy a restored tooth that can last almost as long as its healthy original.


By Charles Dean
October 23, 2012
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Benefits of Cerec Technology

 
All the new technology popping up across different fields of dentistry is something that makes your dental appointment for fillings or crowns that much more pleasant. No more multiple visits; no more waiting for the lab to develop impressions of your teeth; no more lengthy exposure to x-rays. This technology is called CEREC.

CEREC is an acronym for Chairside Economical Restorations of Esthetic Ceramic. It not only can take quicker pictures (high-resolution 3-D imaging) of your teeth to identify exactly how a crown might fit, but crates the impressions right there in the office. The crown is ready for placement in as little as 15 minutes. But the results can last years.

Benefits of CEREC

Speed. It used to take weeks to send plaster impressions to a manufacturer and then get them back for a fitting. It takes the dentist less than twenty minutes to input the specific information on your teeth into the computer and mill your crown.

Precision and accuracy. Because the images taken of your teeth are done at the microscopic level, the plaster impressions are incredibly precise. The data input by your dentist is done with the exact same level of precision. This enables the crown or filling to be milled as accurately as possible.

The ceramic material used to create your crown or filling expands and contracts as your natural teeth do. Because of this, there is no danger of cracking. Furthermore, they are neither too hard nor too soft. There is no undue wear and you will not need to replace them time and again as you might with older crown or filling technology. They also look like your natural teeth.

One of the most important advances with using CEREC is the fact that ceramic crowns and fillings have replaced mercury and other toxic metals. By removing these metals from your mouth, the potential harm they cause has been eliminated. With all of these benefits CEREC offers, why would you consider going to a dentist who does not use it?

 


By Charles Dean
October 18, 2012
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Your first dental visit promises to be a pleasant experience.

Making sound decisions about your dental care and oral health is an easy thing to do with the right preparation beforehand:

  • Make a list of questions to ask our office, so you don't forget anything on the day of your appointment. This includes any concerns you have, or oral problems you've been experiencing.
  • If you have dental insurance, remember to bring your insurance card with you.

NancyODellHelpsPutNewMomsAtEaseAboutInfantOralHealth

During Nancy O'Dell's interview with Dear Doctor magazine, the former co-anchor of Access Hollywood and new co-anchor of Entertainment Tonight could not resist her journalistic instincts to turn the tables so that she could learn more about a baby's oral health. Here are just some of the facts she learned from the publisher of Dear Doctor about childhood tooth decay, pacifier use and what the right age is for a child's first visit to the dentist.

Many moms-to-be and parents or caregivers of young children are surprised to learn that around age 1 is the ideal time to schedule a child's first visit to the dentist. This visit is crucial because it sets the stage for the child's oral health for the rest of his or her life. It can also be quite beneficial for the parents, too, as they can be reassured that there are no problems with development and that the child's teeth appear to be growing properly. And if by chance we identify any concerns, we will discuss them with you as well as any necessary treatment strategies.

Nancy also wanted to learn more about pacifiers — specifically, if it is a good idea for parents to encourage their use. Obviously, children are born with a natural instinct for sucking, so giving a child a pacifier seems totally harmless. Pacifiers definitely have some advantages; however, if used for too long — past the age of 18 months — they can cause long-term changes in the child's developing mouth (both the teeth and the jaws).

Another problem that parents and caregivers need to be aware of is baby bottle syndrome. This is a condition that develops in children who are perpetually sucking on a baby bottle filled with sugary fluids such as formula, fruit juices, cola or any liquids containing a large amount of sugar, honey or other sweeteners. It is important to note that a mother's own breast milk or cow's milk are good choices for feeding babies, as they both contain lactose, a natural sugar that is less likely to cause decay. However, if these liquids are placed in a bottle and a child is allowed to suck on it throughout the night, they, too, can promote tooth decay. The key is to feed your child properly while avoiding all-night feedings and liquids loaded with sugar.

To read the entire Dear Doctor magazine article on Nancy O'Dell as well as to learn more about a baby's oral health, continue reading “Nancy O'Dell — A life full of smiles.” Or you can contact us today to schedule an appointment so that we can conduct a thorough examination, listen to your concerns, answer your questions and discuss any necessary treatment options.


By Charles Dean
October 04, 2012
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month.  From the website of Susan G. Komen:

Susan G. Komen for the Cure® recommends that you: 

1. Know your risk

  • Talk to your family to learn about your family health history
  • Talk to your health care provider about your personal risk of breast cancer

2. Get screened

  • Ask your health care provider which screening tests are right for you if you are at a higher risk
  • Have a mammogram every year starting at age 40 if you are at average risk
  • Have a clinical breast exam at least every three years starting at age 20, and every year starting at age 40

3. Know what is normal for you and see your health care provider if you notice any of these breast changes:

  • Lump, hard knot or thickening inside the breast or underarm area
  • Swelling, warmth, redness or darkening of the breast
  • Change in the size or shape of the breast
  • Dimpling or puckering of the skin
  • Itchy, scaly sore or rash on the nipple
  • Pulling in of your nipple or other parts of the breast
  • Nipple discharge that starts suddenly
  • New pain in one spot that doesn't go away

4. Make healthy lifestyle choices

  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Add exercise into your routine
  • Limit alcohol intake
  • Limit postmenopausal hormone use
  • Breastfeed, if you can 

 




Beavercreek, OH Family Dentist
Beavercreek Dental Group
2385 Lakeview Dr, Suite A
Beavercreek, OH 45431
937-429-3160
Dental Tooth Contact For Pricing Options

Request Appointment

Our office has flexible hours to fit your busy schedule

Archive:

Tags